From Bedsit to Dancefloor


Ben Watt and Tracey Thorn have been the First Couple of Indie for as long as there has been such a thing as Indie, and a lot of us have become adults along with them. The thing I like about these two photos is that you don’t have to have had a successful music career (or still be with your college girlfriend/boyfriend) to relate to the story they tell.

I was a student just a couple of years later than they were and looked the same as they do on the left: the second-hand clothes, the cheap haircut, the white socks. Living in cold rooms and eating tinned food, drinking litre bottles of cheap cider at parties, evenings in the pub putting the world to rights while sinking pints and filling ashtrays. You’re awkward and unsure of yourself, but the freedom of living away from home for the first time widens your horizons and you start to become the person you’re going to be when you grow up.

Then you leave college and take those first steps into the big wide world. If you’re lucky you get a job and have some money in the bank (or an overdraft and credit card bills if you’re me). Your clothes and haircuts get better, you appreciate good food and stop looking like you live on a diet of cold baked beans and roll-ups. Increasing experience and responsibility over the years means you’re no longer a callow amateur but a professional and an adult. 

The photos are also a good illustration of the musical trip Ben and Tracey have taken, from fragile acoustic Indiepop to sophisticated electronic club music — the clothes got better there too.

Download: Night and Day – Everything But The Girl (mp3)
Download: Before Today (Chicane Remix) – Everything But The Girl (mp3)

New Monday



Aubrie Sellers describes her sound as “Garage Country”, mixing her twangy Opry voice with reverb guitars and thumping rock drums. Aubrie is the daughter of Lee Ann Womack so Country music is in her blood but she’s staking out her own territory instead of going the trad fiddles-and-slide-guitar Nashville route.

Her debut album New City Blues has just come out and it’s darn good y’all.

Something for the Weekend



Stop it 2016, just stop it.

What a fantastic band EW&F were, if you’ve never gone beyond the singles and tried any of their 70s albums I recommend you do so.

Commercial Break



This ad from 1981 is one of those rare occasions when advertising is touched with genius.

Picture Post


Download: When The Morning Comes – Daryl Hall & John Oates (mp3)

This is the beautiful opening track of Hall & Oates’ 1973 album Abandoned Luncheonette. It also contains “She’s Gone” so I don’t need to say it’s a great LP you should own.

Photo: The Morning Papers by Bill Brandt (1936)

New Monday


Charlie Hilton, lead singer of Portland indie band Blouse, has just released her first solo album Palana which is terrific and a much simpler, light-footed affair than their murky dream-pop.

Blouse are a decent band but I’ve never liked them the way I do this record. The way Charlie’s disaffected vocals float over spacey synth landscapes makes it sound at times like a lost Broadcast album. Elsewhere there are pastoral-hippy acoustic touches and even Jazz on one track to give it the feel of someone exploring different sides of her personality away from her day job. 

You could say she’s changed her blouse — hahahaha.


Something for the Weekend



Dennis Edwards: Magnificent bastard.

Post-Punk Comix


The pop charts in the post-punk era was not only a golden age for the 45 but also for record company marketing gimmicks. Singles came in coloured vinyl, picture discs, wrapped in newspapers, with double grooves, and multiple sleeves and stamps.

They didn’t always work though, even for established bands like The Skids. In 1980 their third album The Absolute Game made the Top Ten of the album charts but all the singles from it tanked despite being given a gimmicky promo push by Virgin Records. The first single “Circus Games” was wrapped in a poster of the band but only got to #32, while “A Woman In Winter” which stalled 10 places lower came with an 11-page comic called Pirate Gold which starred the band in a ripping yarn about lost treasure.



It’s not exactly Stan Lee and Jack Kirby but still a clever idea and a sign of just how creatively healthy and competitive the pop scene was at the time. Those were the days when a noisy post-punk band like The Skids could appear on the cover of Smash Hits and I guess the comics and glossy posters were an attempt to sell the band to that crowd instead serious young men in overcoats.

It’s not as if these were bad records either, “Circus Games” was stonkingly catchy and “A Woman In Winter” was glorious, uplifting stuff with guitar work by Stuart Adamson that sounds like a rehearsal for Big Country. Should have been an Xmas hit. I bought it with the comic but would still have done if it came in a gravy-stained brown paper bag. Maybe Virgin should have asked Richard Jobson to make his lyrics more coherent instead.

Download: A Woman In Winter – The Skids (mp3)

What’s it all about?

The sentimental musings of an ageing expat in words, music, and pictures. Mp3 files are up for a limited time so drink them while they're hot. Contact me: lee at londonlee dot com

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