New Monday



Not sure how to describe the music made by THEESatisfaction — I’m not entirely sure how to pronounce their name either (did they have trouble with the Caps Lock button on their keyboard?) — but it’s sort of abstract, free-jazzy, futuristic, hip-hoppy R&B. Whatever it is, I love it.

Something for the Weekend



You’re welcome.

Yeeeeaaaaassssss!!!!!!


That’s about as coherent as I can be after that unbelievable win by my boys. Bugger me, what a game.

Download: Hope and Glory – The Skids (mp3)

Mopey Monday


Bill Fay’s first solo album is like the Sgt. Pepper of Mope.

Download: Gentle Willie – Bill Fay (mp3)
Buy: Bill Fay (album)

Something for the Weekend



I came across this clip while reading a bit about the late Dick Clark and it’s one of the most magnificently surreal things I’ve ever seen on pop television, like alien creatures have landed in some small Midwestern town in the 1950s.

Trip Hop Don’t Stop (Bonus Beats)

A couple others that are contenders for my bestest evah Trip Hop/Electronica/Knob-Twiddling albums:



Buy: Lamb – Lamb (album)



Buy: Blue Wonder Power Milk – Hooverphonic (album)

Seeing as what goes around in pop music usually comes around again, you’d think we were about due a Trip Hop revival of some kind given the length of time since it first started. But maybe for a genre to be revived it has to sound dated and a bit cheesy at some point and it still sounds new and fresh out of the wrapper to me.

Trip Hop Don’t Stop


Apart from a brief Britpop blip when I bought a couple of Oasis and Blur CDs I spent most of the mid- to late 1990s listening to Trip Hop or its mutant offspring Downtempo, Chill-Out, and Electronica. It was the soundtrack when I was dating my wife, and on our honeymoon in New York I bought a copy of Felt Mountain which I heard for the first time in our hotel room so it definitely defined an era for me. Though some of it was derided as trendy background music for designer boutique shopping and middle-class dinner parties, I thought it was the best thing to come out of Bristol since Cary Grant.

I had to pick myself up off the floor when I realized that it’s been over 20 years (20!) since Massive Attack released Blue Lines which, along with Portishead’s Dummy a few years later, pretty much defined Trip Hop and opened the gates to a flood of bands mixing up stoned beats with moody electronics, crackly samples, and cinematic strings. But my favourite Trip Hop album was by another mob from Bristol, the gloriously woozy Come From Heaven by Alpha. I have no idea how well known the album is (probably not much) but it’s felt like my precious secret love since it came out in 1997.


Alpha sloooowed their beats and samples down to a crawl to make hypnotic, somnabulent music that sounded so dosed up on cough mixture it didn’t have the energy to get out of bed — there’s even a track on it called “Nyquil” which I assume is meant to be a joke. With the two lead singers’ emotionally-bruised fragility it drifts along in the most beautiful, foggy haze, like comedown music for the mother of all hangovers (or drug highs, whatever turns you on.) Not that I have those sort of nights anymore, but this first track especially still sets me adrift on memory bliss.

Download: Somewhere Not Here – Alpha (mp3)
Download: Rain – Alpha (mp3)
Buy: Come From Heaven (album)

Mopey Monday


Ally has her Torment Tuesday so I’ll have me a Mopey Monday: a spot for random posts of tunes that are sad, wistful, and wetter than a Bank Holiday weekend in Margate.

First up is some glum indiepop from 2002 by a band who always sounded like their tea had gone cold.

Download: Miserable Town – Harper Lee (mp3)
Buy: Everything’s Going to Be OK (album)

What’s it all about?

The sentimental musings of an ageing expat in words, music, and pictures. Mp3 files are up for a limited time so drink them while they're hot. Contact me: lee at londonlee dot com

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