Buried Treasure


You’ll know this song if you have Stevie Wonder’s 1980 album Hotter Than July where it first appeared. He actually wrote it way back in 1966 when it was originally recorded by Tammi Terrell but her version was never released.

Motown’s quality control was famously strict but one listen to this beauty and you’ll think they crossed the line between perfectionism and insanity if they deemed this to be not good enough.

What’s even crazier is it remained buried and unheard until 2002 when it was finally released on the amazing A Cellarful of Motown! collection which is chock full of similar unreleased gems and can’t be recommended enough.

Download: All I Do Is Think About You – Tammi Terrell (mp3)

The song was also recorded by Brenda Holloway (with what sounds like the same backing track) and that wasn’t released at the time either. Motown = Crazy bastards.

Something for the Weekend



This song is such a classic, gut-wrenching, heartbreaker. Wonderful to hear them do it live.

Commercial Break



I have this album but I don’t think we were ever treated to this tremendous commercial on British TV.

This is side one, track two. Sublime Philly Soul from 1973.

Download: Armed and Extremely Dangerous – First Choice (mp3)

Something for the Weekend



Trying to think of something clever to say about this but I’m too floored by how great it is.

Something for the Weekend



Dennis Edwards: Magnificent bastard.

New Monday



Adrian Younge is a musician/writer/producer heavily influenced by the sounds of 70s soul, particularly the cinematic grooves of Blaxploitation soundtracks. He first came to my attention a couple of years ago with an album he produced for The Delfonics which recalled their Philly-Soul glory days so beautifully that you really should hear if you haven’t.

His latest album Something About April II has guest vocal turns by a diverse crowd including Raphael Saadiq and Laetitia Sadier, with music that also has elements of Hip Hop, Psychedelia, and Ennio Morricone. It sounds like the soundtrack to the coolest, trippiest movie ever. Love it.

Lost Soul


This is another of those lost records I strongly suspect I was one of the only people to buy. It’s a wonderful, gorgeous track I only heard by chance back in 1985 because a DJ friend of mine was part of local (and very short-lived) pirate station called Radio Fulham and he played it on the air one Saturday night when I was getting ready to go out. I never would have heard it if I didn’t feel obliged to listen to my mate’s radio show but that one listen was enough for me to go out and buy the 12″ right away. Well, a couple of days later anyway. I think I was in the bath at the time, no doubt sprucing myself up for another night of failure with the opposite sex.

I knew nothing about First Love for years, but now I know they were a female quartet from Chicago who released several singles and an album, none of which were hits. This one really should have been though: It’s a soaring, shimmering ballad with an electronic-soul sound similar to Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis’ productions for the SOS Band, which isn’t too surprising as it was written and produced by their keyboard player Jason Bryant.

Real lost gem this, hope you like it.

Download: Things Are Not The Same (Without You) – First Love (mp3)

Lemon Drops


The Celebrity Grim Reaper was busy in the week between Christmas and New Year, taking Lemmy, Natalie Cole, The Specials’ drummer John Bradbury and Guru Josh (not Guru Josh!) off to meet their maker. But I’m not kidding when I say the one that upset me the most personally was the death of legendary Harlem Globetrotter Meadowlark Lemon.

Basketball is a niche sport in England and when I was a kid we’d never even heard of the NBA and couldn’t name a single American team. But we knew all about The Harlem Globetrotters (who actually came from Chicago), the exhibition team who toured the world playing “matches” against opponents they always beat which were full of trick shots and clownish routines and more about entertainment than sports.

They were such a pop-culture phenomenon in the early 70s they had their own Hanna-Barbera cartoon show on television (the first one made with a primarily black cast) and made guest appearances on Scooby-Doo.



My mum took me to see them at Wembley Empire Pool (now the Arena) one year and actually seeing Lemon — the star of the team nicknamed “The Clown Prince of Basketball” — doing his famous Hook Shot and that gag with the bucket full of confetti was one of the major treats of my childhood.

But it was their cartoon show that really made them household names with my generation of English kids, and because of it Meadowlark Lemon (how could you forget that name!) became part of the pantheon of loved TV stars I watched after school. So when I heard the news about his death it felt like Hong Kong Phooey or Secret Squirrel had died. No wonder I was so upset.

Download: Harlem – Edwin Starr (mp3)

This soulful beauty by Edwin Starr was the b-side of “Headline News” in 1966.

What’s it all about?

The sentimental musings of an ageing expat in words, music, and pictures. Mp3 files are up for a limited time so drink them while they're hot. Contact me: lee at londonlee dot com

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